Faith Awakenings: Prayer in Motion


Donald Remick

3/28/2018

Not all prayer happens in sitting positions  There are traditions that focus on stillness in motion.  If you have ever paced to contemplate or resolve and problem you have touched on the edge of this.  But prayer in motion is more than just moving prayer. Martial arts are based on this concept. As is their origin in Tai Chi. Yoga builds on this. In Buddhism there is a concept known as kinhin or walking meditation.  Wikipedia describes it here.  You can also learn more here.
 
In the last few decades, a popular form of walking meditation has taken hold: Labyrinths.  A labyrinth is like a maze with one clear exception: there are no wrong turns. You follow a path. It occupies your conscious mind just enough so that your unconscious is freed to meditate. Most labyrinths start by bringing you almost into the center before turning again back to the outer edges.  It follows the metaphor of spiritual journeys that move us in winding ways into the center before returning us out into the world (hopefully more grounded and opened by the process).

Labyrinths have been found on every continent dating back thousands of years. There is something profound about them that connects to a deep need within people. The Labyrinth Guild of New England can provide more information including locations of public labryinths; check them out here.  And if you are visiting our MACUCC Conference Center in Framingham, check out the labyrinth near Edwards House (shown in photo above).  

If you know or practice meditation in motion in any of its forms, share your insights and resources on our website.  
 



One in a series. Visit the Faith Awakenings Web page on this site for more. 



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